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Duke Receives Two Critically Endangered Lemurs from Madagascar

By Sara Clark DURHAM, N.C. — After three years of planning and 60 hours of travel, a new pair of lemurs have arrived at the Duke Lemur Center in North Carolina, 9,000 miles from their home in Madagascar. The breeding pair will be used to improve the gene pool of captive members of the critically […]



Infants Announced: Four Lemurs Representing Four Different Species Born at Duke Lemur Center

Four Infants Representing Four Different Species Born at Duke Lemur Center Lemurs are the planet’s most threatened group of mammals. At the Duke Lemur Center, we’re excited to announce that this summer, the population of these endangered primates has increased by an additional FOUR! In collaboration with other accredited institutions, the Duke Lemur Center works […]



Celebrating World Environment Day with the DLC-SAVA Team in Madagascar

The celebration of World Environment Day started one day early in the SAVA region of Madagascar this year! The entire DLC-SAVA team held an environmental education celebration at the school in the village of Andasibe Kobahina, not far from Marojejy National Park. (Marojejy is one of the last great expanses of primary rainforest in Madagascar […]



Could poop transplants speed recovery for sick lemurs?

Read the full release: “Lemur Research Gets A Gut Check.” Lydia and Erin’s work is an excellent example of the non-invasive research conducted at the DLC — and how, by working closely with our technician, conservation, and veterinary staff, Duke researchers help improve the welfare of the DLC’s lemur population! Learn more about Duke graduate student Lydia Greene in “Greene Finds […]