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Videos: SAVA Conservation

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Learn more about the DLC-SAVA Conservation project with this series of videos! After watching, we also invite you to visit our archive of annual newsletters highlighting the DLC’s work in Madagascar.

The DLC’s conservation projects in Madagascar are funded entirely through grants and donations, so your contributions turn our conservation dreams into realities. Please consider supporting us with a tax-deductible donation today!


Introduction: 10 Years in the SAVA


In 2021, we proudly celebrated the 10-year anniversary of the DLC-SAVA Conservation project. We commemorated the occasion with this film, highlighting some of the top priority projects in our conservation programs.


Climate Change


Climate change is affecting everyone across the globe. Unfortunately, in low-income countries like Madagascar, people are bearing the burden of climate change and experiencing its effects firsthand. DLC-SAVA partnered with a local civil society organization to conduct outreach events informing rural communities about climate change, as well as adaptation and mitigation strategies, co-sponsored by the U.K. Embassy.


Landscape Restoration


To restore forests and the benefits those habitats have for people and wildlife, DLC-SAVA supports local communities to plant trees in areas that have been deforested. Our approach combines restoring forest with native trees as well as developing agroforestry with high-value cash crops like cloves and vanilla. Here is an example of our landscape restoration efforts at one of the sites, the sacred mountain of Ambanitaza.


From Dream to Reality


At the New Generation School Garden, founded by DLC-SAVA Education Specialist Evrard Benasoavina, children learn about the environment, ecosystem services for people, and sustainability. Lessons emphasize plants and animals endemic to the SAVA region, including 25 species of lemur. “The children are always surprised by how many species we have in our region,” says Evrard. “It gives a sense of pride about the valuable biodiversity found only here.”


Student Research in the SAVA

DLC-SAVA Program Coordinator Dr. James Herrera spent much of summer 2022 in the COMATSA/Ambodivoara area of the SAVA, working with teams of students from CURSA, Duke University, and other institutions. One team of students worked in the COMATSA forest conducting lemur surveys and ecological research, as seen in the first video; while the second team did sociological and agricultural work in the village of Ambodivoara, which can be seen in the second video. The students from Duke and other American universities were supported by Duke’s Bass Connections and Story+ programs.