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Fossil Friday: Babakotia, an extinct sloth lemur

By Matt Borths, Curator of the Duke Lemur Center’s Division of Fossil Primates. Happy #FossilFriday! (Or #TGIFF as we say at the Division of Fossil Primates!) Today we’re seeing double as Vicki, our fossil preparator,* finishes a cast of Babakotia, an extinct lemur that was built like a sloth! The name Babakotia comes from the Malagasy word for […]



Fossil Friday: Archaeolemur

By Matt Borths, Curator of the Duke Lemur Center’s Division of Fossil Primates. This jaw is from the extinct giant lemur Archaeolemur, which means “ancient lemur” even though it probably only went extinct a few centuries ago in Madagascar. Like all lemurs, Archaeolemur has a tooth comb, a forward-facing fusion of its incisors and canines. That […]



Save the lemurs! Eat the crickets!

By Matt Simon. Published on Wired.com on March 5, 2019: https://www.wired.com/story/save-the-lemurs-eat-the-crickets. “One group of researchers and conservationists thinks it can also use edible insects to save endangered mammals. They’ve spent the past few years developing a program to encourage the people of Madagascar—who have historically consumed insects—to re-embrace bugs as a source of protein. That […]



Fossil Friday: Prohylobates, an 18-million-year-old relative of Old World Monkeys

By Matt Borths, Curator of the Duke Lemur Center’s Division of Fossil Primates. In the Division of Fossil Primates at the Duke Lemur Center, we have fossils that can be used to explore all the major branches of the primate family. These two dark specimens are from Prohylobates, an 18-million-year-old relative of Old World Monkeys, the […]