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Wild Workshops

Our “Love and Lemurs” Wild Workshop in February 2019 discussed the art and science of lemur reproduction: how lemurs choose their mates (hint: there’s a lot of SCENT involved), how many infants a lemur can have, and why the DLC participates in a conservation breeding program!

Overview

Attention serious lemur lovers and science enthusiasts: we have an amazing new educational series for you! Starting in 2020, we will be offering Wild Workshops throughout the year! Each Wild Workshop will focus on a different subject connected to the work the DLC does here and in Madagascar. We’ll do a deep-dive into subjects like our conservation breeding program, enrichment and play, primate evolution, and so much more!

Each workshop will include customized programming for a recommended age group based on the subject we’re exploring. We will be including specialized presentations, husbandry and/or research demonstrations, and possibly even behind-the-scenes views that are catered to each Wild Workshop theme.

Because our Wild Workshops will focus heavily on a particular topic, we strongly recommend that guests only register for a Wild Workshop after attending one of our many other tour experiences. Please see below for a list of upcoming subjects.

If you don’t want to miss out when a new Wild Workshop registration opens, please send us an email at primate@duke.edu. Just let us know that you’d like to go on our Wild Workshop interest list, and you will get an email as soon as any registrations open up!

Upcoming workshops – 2020 Dates Announced!

We are now accepting registrations for the following Wild Workshops:  

Sunday, 2/16/2020 and Sunday, 2/23/2020 – Love and Lemurs (for ages 21+) This awesome workshop focusing on lemur reproduction was so much fun, we’re bringing it back -and we’ve added some new elements we think you’ll really love! To learn more and to reserve your space, please see our Love and Lemurs registration page.

Sunday, 3/15/2020 and Sunday, 3/22/2020 – Lemurs, Research, and Poop, Oh My! (for ages 12+) Did you know researchers have traveled from far and wide, just to study lemur poop?? Find out what all the stink is about with this new workshop highlighting how lemur poop shapes everything from animal care to research projects here at the DLC. To learn more and to reserve your space, please see our Lemurs, Research, and Poop registration page.

Sunday, 3/29/2020 and Sunday, 4/5/2020 –  Lemur Enrichment and Training (for ages 12+) From crafting a puzzle feeder from recycled cardboard boxes to creating training plans tailored to each individual lemur, we have over 50 years of knowledge to share with you! We’ll also show examples of the fun activities and amazing training we do with the 200+ prosimians that call the DLC home. To learn more and to reserve your space, please see our Lemur Enrichment and Training registration page.

Future workshops

See below for a list of other topics we’re hoping to launch in 2020. Don’t see the subject you’re most interested in learning about? Email us at primate@duke.edu to let us know what you’d like to us do next!

Deep Dive: Coquerel’s Sifaka!

Lemur Yoga: A Study in Primate Locomotion* — For the safety of the lemurs and our guests, please note that no visitors are allowed any physical contact with the animals. See note below for further details.

Deep Dive: Ring-tailed Lemurs!

Primate Evolution — Featuring the DLC’s very own Division of Fossil Primates!

Lemurs, Legends, and Lore – Oh My!

Deep Dive: Nocturnal Lemurs!

Deep Dive: Ruffed Lemurs!

*Please note: Because lemurs are wild animals, the Duke Lemur Center is a strictly no-touch facility. For the safety of our guests and our lemurs, we do not allow any interactions between our guests and the animals. Our “Lemur Yoga” workshop will include time seeing the lemurs, and even some time inside the DLC’s signature Natural Habitat Enclosures with no barriers between us and the lemurs; but all guests must maintain at least a 3-foot distance from the lemurs at all times. Our yoga session will take place elsewhere on our grounds — not inside the lemurs’ enclosures and not with the animals themselves.