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Introducing Bijou & Nacho, Endangered Infants Born at Duke Lemur Center

The Duke Lemur Center is delighted to announce the births of two infants, Bijou and Nacho! Bijou, a female collared lemur (Eulemur fulvus collaris), was born on April 5, 2017 to parents Odette and Quintin. This gal is notoriously tough to photograph, but our stealthy photographer David Haring finally succeeded in snapping the adorable images below. Collared lemurs are […]



Infants Announced: Two Critically Endangered Blue-Eyed Black Lemurs Born at the Duke Lemur Center

  Infants Announced: Two Critically Endangered Blue-Eyed Black Lemurs Born at the Duke Lemur Center We’re thrilled to announce our newest arrivals: two critically endangered Eulemur flavifrons infants, McKinnon and Poehler! Both blue-eyed girls were born within a day of one another: McKinnon on March 22 to parents Wiig and Hiddleston, and Poehler on March […]



Mouse Lemurs’ Role in New Alzheimer’s Hypothesis

Lemurs aren’t just cute, they’re crucial Why are lemurs so special? Here’s just ONE reason: Because non-invasive research on grey mouse lemurs has helped shed light on devastating human diseases like Alzheimer’s: https://today.duke.edu/2017/03/jumping-genes-suspected-alzheimers. Like humans, mouse lemurs develop amyloid brain plaques and other Alzheimer’s-like symptoms as they age. Studying these tiny primates has helped lead to a […]



Avocados Blamed for Sudden Deaths of Four Aye-Ayes

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 CONTACT: Karl Leif Bates (919) 681-8054 karl.bates@duke.edu DURHAM, NC — A two-month investigation into the sudden deaths of four aye-ayes at the Duke Lemur Center has left just one plausible explanation — avocados. Lemur Center officials believe that a natural toxin found in avocados the animals ate the […]